EVEN COWGIRLS GET THE BLUES BY TOM ROBBINS PDF

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What could any book, a mere vessel of subjective interpretation, tell us about time, an invisible system of measuring change? It turns out that I felt neither deceived nor confused — or, rather, I did feel those things, but about the subject and not the book. But a subject like time travel, as we savvy citizens of the 21st century well know by now, is rife with paradox, and any account of its history must not only engage with those incongruities but transcend them in some powerful way.

There has to be, in other words, more insight than one would find in a given episode of Doctor Who. It is amazing what human beings can become bored with. Gleick is particularly suited to the task of writing a history of time travel.

Gleick was also the founder, with Uday Ivatury, of The Pipeline in , one of the earliest Internet service providers. Time travel, for such a writer, must be almost bromidic. Every time I felt I had a grasp on a particular way of thinking about time, some new theory threw my understanding out the window.

For example, Gleick begins his history with the creator of time travel, H. Wells, and his monumental work of science fiction of , The Time Machine. They taught you that? Neither has a mathematical plane. These things are mere abstractions. But wait a moment.

Can an instantaneous cube exist? Just as my brain congratulated itself for its keen comprehension, it was thrown for a new loop. Gleick, though, through his years of scientific authorship, has become an artful writer who clearly has a deep love for literature, consequently employing fictional techniques in his nonfiction work.

The sun is pale in a charcoal sky. We hear shrill jet blasts, a ghostly choir, murmuring voices. Time Travel is as elegant and eloquent as it is edifying. This love of literature manifests in other ways in the book, too, also beneficially. Though Gleick runs the gambit of physicists and philosophers and theorists from St.

For instructive tools, Gleick takes the reader through, e. But perhaps my favorite is that episode of Doctor Who Gleick discusses which I at first wanted to summarize here to grapple with a bit but which proved way too elaborate to do in anything fewer than like seven or eight sentences, and this is already getting too long as it is. It is, rather, space that is the illusion. Hammond shows how time affects more aspects of our lives than we might assume, like conversations: To produce and understand speech, we rely on critical timings of less than a tenth of a second.

This relies on timing accurate to the millisecond. But what the hell do I know?

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Even Cowgirls Get the Blues – Language Over Story

What could any book, a mere vessel of subjective interpretation, tell us about time, an invisible system of measuring change? It turns out that I felt neither deceived nor confused — or, rather, I did feel those things, but about the subject and not the book. But a subject like time travel, as we savvy citizens of the 21st century well know by now, is rife with paradox, and any account of its history must not only engage with those incongruities but transcend them in some powerful way. There has to be, in other words, more insight than one would find in a given episode of Doctor Who. It is amazing what human beings can become bored with.

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Even Cowgirls Get the Blues

Sissy capitalizes on the size of her thumbs by becoming a hitchhiker and subsequently travels to New York. The character becomes a model for The Countess, a male homosexual tycoon of menstrual hygiene products. In her later travels, she encounters, among many others, a sexually open cowgirl named Bonanza Jellybean and an itinerant escapee from a Japanese internment camp happily mislabeled The Chink. The Chink is presented as a hermetic mystic and, at one point writes on a cave wall, "I believe in everything; nothing is sacred. I believe in nothing; everything is sacred. Robbins also inserts himself into the novel as a character.

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